decentralization

Testing peer-to-peer systems with Testground

“Test, test, test” is a well known sentence right now due to the current circumstances. However, it does not apply only to Covid-19 or other diseases. Testing is one word that all of us have dreamt - or had nightmares - about in the past. It is also one crucial part and step in the Software Engineering and Development process, as it allows to verify and ensure that a certain system behaves as expected. At least, for known cases! As such, all kinds of systems should be able to be easily tested, regardless of what they do. Nevertheless, both you and I know that that is not the case. There are certain systems that are much easy to test than others, in many orders of magnitude. For example, a library that converts between different times formats is much easier to test than an app to upload and download files. Furthermore, any system that involves peer-to-peer communication or any other kind of distribution gets much harder to test!

The Future is Decentralized

We are living in an increasingly interconnected world. Today, 4.1 billion people have access to the internet. And with every passing year, millions more are born into the world as “digital natives” with digital technology and the World Wide Web at their fingertips from early childhood. But as the internet becomes more and more intertwined with our everyday lives, we must remember that it’s up to us to set the right course for the web’s future and to continue improving it. Today, control over the internet is increasingly centralized in the hands of just a few big tech companies. Decentralizing the web through new technologies like blockchain and decentralized protocols can ensure that the web remains community-focused and user-oriented, just like it was originally intended to be. To see why, and to help envision how decentralization will build a better future for the internet, we have to understand how the internet first came to be and what makes it work.

Back to the web of the 90s

@media screen and (min-width: 38rem) { body { background: #010d2a url(sea.jpg); background-size: 300px; background-attachment: fixed; } } Over the past months, I have been reading more and more posts where people are saying they miss the vibe of the 90s web. Even though I wasn’t alive to see how that web was, I still remember the website of my high school filled with overly saturated colors, GIFs and iframes. Not only that characterizes some of the pages of the early web, but also the pixelation and the footers saying to use X or Y browser. We know those kinds of websites are a mirage nowadays, but some of them are still accessible via the Internet Archive. There is one really interesting service called Neocities, which I talked about in the past, that aims to bring the glory of the Geocities to today’s web.

Jan-Lukas Else 12 May 2020 17:45

Telegram wanted to launch a cryptocurrency, but now they stopped that experiment because a US court stopped them and the US has too much power they rather didn’t want to feel.I am writing this post to officially announce that Telegram’s active involvement with TON is …

That is really sad to hear. Decentralization is a huge part of the future of the Internet for many reasons. Not relying on centralized services is important to build a web of trust, of freedom and transparency. It’s really unfortunate to see how the US can have such a powerful impact on other countries' citizens…

Mirroring xkcd comics to IPFS

As many of you probably know, xkcd is a web comic created in 2005 by Randall Munroe. Its tagline is “A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language”. You can read more about the web comic itself on their website.

As part of wanting to contribute to IPFS Archives, I decided to look at the issues and find the most interesting one for me, and I did: xkcd! There were some clones already built, but all of them were out of date and weren’t automatically updated.