ownyourowndata

Back to the web of the 90s

@media screen and (min-width: 38rem) { body { background: #010d2a url(sea.jpg); background-size: 300px; background-attachment: fixed; } } Over the past months, I have been reading more and more posts where people are saying they miss the vibe of the 90s web. Even though I wasn’t alive to see how that web was, I still remember the website of my high school filled with overly saturated colors, GIFs and iframes. Not only that characterizes some of the pages of the early web, but also the pixelation and the footers saying to use X or Y browser. We know those kinds of websites are a mirage nowadays, but some of them are still accessible via the Internet Archive. There is one really interesting service called Neocities, which I talked about in the past, that aims to bring the glory of the Geocities to today’s web.

Analyzing my shows and movie habits

Today, I decided to readd a watches page, but this time it isn’t built from hundreds of posts, but from the data that I get directly from Trakt’s API. I built a small tool called trakt-collector used to collect your history and save it in JSON format.

The Trakt API gives you so much information about every episode and every movie: from the title, to the rating, description, channel where it aired, when it aired first, the countries where it aired, etc, etc. I don’t actually need all that information, but it’s never too much to store.

OwnYourTrakt

For quite some time, I have been getting more and more into the IndieWeb world and trying to own my own data. I have started publishing more to my website and using it as a place to store most of my public data, i.e., data I already published on other social media and platforms.

It now holds my web interactions, such as replies, likes and reposts, as well as my reading log. Since the beginning, I also wanted to this website as a place to store my watch logs. With watch I mean watching movies and TV series.

Adding support for Micropub endpoint

Recently, I have talked about restructuring the URLs of my website and adding IndieAuth so I could use my domain as my main online identity to login into services. Along those lines, I came across Micropub. In their own words:

The Micropub protocol is used to create, update and delete posts on one’s own domain using third-party clients.

So it’s basically a simple common protocol that could let any website get updated using an arbitrary CMS (Content Management Software) or application that supports it. I really enjoyed the spec and there’s suggestions and issues being worked on.